Saying Farewell to The Boy King

This may be your last chance to witness King Tut

Don't miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see the treasures from King Tut's tomb

Don't miss this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see the treasures from King Tut's tomb

 

 

 

A gold inlaid canopic coffinette which stored the organs of the pharaoh sits below a human head stopper formed of calcite

Since March of 2018, in an exhibit titled “King Tut: Treasures of the Golden Pharaoh”, the largest collection of artifacts recovered from King Tut’s tomb to ever leave the nation has embarked on a worldwide tour. The collection of artifacts featured in the exhibit includes 150 precious items. Previously, the largest number of artifacts from the Pharaoh’s tomb to depart Egypt had been 55. This exhibition marks the official last time artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb will leave Egypt, as they will be permanently stored in the new Grand Egyptian Museum currently under construction in Cairo which is set to open in 2021.

Wooden Guardian of Ka Statue

The tour will travel around the globe, and will be displayed on multiple continents. In March of 201, the exhibit was displayed first in Los Angeles. The exhibit left LA in January of this year and is now currently being displayed in the Grande Halle De La Villette in Paris until September. Many of the upcoming locations of the exhibit have yet to be released, however known future destinations of the Pharaoh’s grave goods include:

  • London- The Saatchi Gallery from November 2, 2019 until 3, May 2020
  • Sydney- Australian Museum for 6 months during 2021

Other planned locations the exhibit will likely appear in include Japan, Canada, and South Korea.

A small, precious statue featured in the exhibit

The exhibit will display an array of stunning objects such as giant statues gilded in gold, goldenĀ  jewelry, a gilded bed, and a large shrine gilded in gold and displaying scenes of Tutankhamun. Disappointingly, the exhibit will not feature the famed golden burial mask of the Pharaoh. The mask has been deemed too fragile for travel and it is not permitted to leave Egypt. Throughout the exhibit, visitors will be engaged by an audio tour, 3D visuals, and digital displays.

This exhibition marks the official last time artifacts from Tutankhamun’s tomb will leave Egypt”

Unsurprisingly, the exhibit is expected to have sell- out sales, and it is suggested that visitors order tickets on-line and purchase in advance. The tickets to the exhibit will cost between $19-$30 and are for 30 minute time slots in the exhibit. Ultimately, the proceeds from the exhibit will go towards the construction of the new museum back in Cairo.

A chalice known as a wishing cup carved from pure alabaster and marked with the name of King Tut wishes him eternal life

Upon completion, the museum in Cairo will house roughly 100,000 artifacts from across Egypt’s history. The museum will also feature, for the first time, the entire collection of artifacts recovered from King Tut’s tomb, including the artifacts currently on tour. The Egyptian government hopes the traveling exhibit will spark the same intensity of interest in Egyptian history and archaeology when 50 artifacts toured the world in the 1970s.

This once-in-a-lifetime exhibit is not to be missed, and I hope you are inspired to visit one of the destinations featuring this stunning array of ancient treasures.

 

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